How to NOT Quit Your Day Job and Travel

There are tons of articles and inspirational stories about how people quit their jobs and traveled the world, how people made a living out of it or even found ways to travel the word for free. But not all of us have that luxury or the need to do so, some of us have commitments and in fact some of us actually love our day jobs. Taking a break and traveling somehow makes it more special, more earned, more sought after. Everything over done can be boring and I for one never want travel to be boring. So here’s an article, for a change, about how to travel relatively excessively while still having a full time job.

IMG_6874

The first thing we see as we wake up each day – a push pin map up on our bedroom wall

1. Have that burning desire to travel…for adventure, to see and experience new things – unless you really really want to travel it’s not going to happen. You may look at other people’s pictures and stories wishfully but if you don’t want it badly enough it ain’t gonna happen. Travel is going to cost you and that “payment” in return for all those memorable experiences has to be more important than a lot of other material things. If travel isn’t your priority then again it ain’t gonna happen, make the choice and don’t complain. #noexcuses

2. Maximize number of days – the first question people always ask us is how we manage to do it with a full time job, how we manage to get days off work. Actually it’s quite simple – here our secret (might be very obvious when you read it). We plan all our travels around public holidays. Every additional day you get to spend in some exotic location is like gold when you have a full time job. Unfortunately for us Singapore (where we live) doesn’t have a lot of public holidays unlike our beautiful motherland (Sri Lanka) but we make it work.

Here’s our actual holiday calendar from last year –

Leave calendar

3. Plan well in advance – this I know for a lot of people is a huge hassle, then do yourself a favour and hire a travel agent (if you want I highly recommend THE TRAVELLED :)) lots of people travel during long weekends and prices soar! The only way out is early planning. Also if you want to experience some of the most unique things that sell out fast, there is no other choice.

Pro had to book a meal at Jules Verne inside the Eiffel Tower 6 months in advance as a surprise during our trip to Paris. Even then he couldn’t get us in for dinner.

10557425_10152617362262853_1927139858643402472_n

An exclusive look out, reserved only for diners at Jules Verne on top of the Eiffle Tower

CSC_0231

We bought the passes to see the mountain gorillas forever in advance because it was a bucket list item we really wanted to tick while in Africa.

img_5309

Coming up close and personal with a Silverback Mountain Gorilla, during our trek in Rwanda

4. Make use of benefits your work place offers – if you are lucky enough to work for a progressive company that believes in things like agile working, make use of it! Be disciplined about and ensure you don’t slack, but working out of a quaint coffee shop in Fremantle with a sea view is way better than sitting at your desk. Plus you still have a few hours everyday to explore your surroundings

 

IMG_4170

Working off a cafe in Fremantle, the coffee though..!

IMG_4131

That very same work day ended like this, just before the sun set

Pro and I go back home every Christmas. We end up spending about 2 weeks in Sri Lanka and work about a week from home. Working from your dining room, having your mum’s home cooked lunch is a gazillion times more satisfying and productive than your office desk. Also you have the entire evening to catch up with friends from home. Precious.

IMG_7878

Home for Christmas

 

5. When work takes you places, extend – if you are blessed enough to travel with work, make the most of it. It’s a bit difficult to plan in advance but sometimes a weekend on either side or just an extra day is all you need. When Pro and I first started traveling way back when we were still working in Sri Lanka, we got the chance to travel to Singapore thrice within a year for a training. We extend each trip and covered 3 other cities – Hong Kong, Phuket and Manila.

Work took me to Africa last year, Pro joined me and we took a week off together.

IMG_5536

Waderlusting at the entrance of the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Once in London for work, all I needed was one extra day to bask in a rare sunny day during the British Spring.


5. Maximize time on your holiday – we are definitely not the type of tourists that hop on a tour bus and rush from place to place just to snap a quick photo and tick a box. Having said that we do really try to make the most of our holiday. Time is precious when you have a limited number of days off from work and your inbox is overflowing while you are away. So make choices, a little extra effort and time on the road will be completely worth it.

When we went to South America we really wanted to see Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia. It was completely and utterly out of the way, but who knew when we’d make it to this far away land again? So we made it happen. Taking 2 flights (which we had to research like hell to find) and paying extra for transfers we made it to see the world’s biggest mirror and what a journey it was! We had to skip Bolivia’s bohemian capital La Paz and had to sacrifice Lake Titicaca in Peru and only had 2 nights in the Bolivian wilderness, but I’d do it again any day. Just to see those stunning desert lakes and the salt flat.

file_0021

Salar de Uyuni in all its glory

file_0001

Making full use of the stunning landscape to take some interesting pics

Just this Spring, we went to Japan and really wanted to maximize our chance of seeing Mount Fuji. So we hired a car and drove in a hail storm to the town of Kawaguchi-ko at the foot of the mountain. The next day we were rewarded with stunning views of the almost symmetrical volcano.

IMG_9572

Driving in a hail storm to Kawaguchi-ko, Japan

IMG_9675

Rewarded the next day with breathtaking views of Mount Fuji

Or the time we spent way more than we should have, to fly to Uluru in the middle of the red desert in Australia, just to see the iconic Ayer’s Rock

263125_10151643186927853_861621677_n

This sacred rock was such a special place with an amazing vibe you could actually feel

Or the crazy dash we made to the remote town of Jiuzhaigou in China to witness the unique turquoise lakes, a serious effort was required.

1424417_10152116417382853_1091925220_n

Multi coloured lakes in Jiuzhaigou, China

So all in all, this is how we manage to pull off sometimes 16 countries a year while having a full time job! And we our total count as of now is 50, that’s only 1/4th of this beautiful blue planet, there is so much more to see.

IMG_0247
Be wanderlusters, make choices, if it’s too much let a professional handle the planning!

Good luck and tell us how it goes…

An Arctic Adventure in Search of Aurora Borealis

“Arctic?!? No way!! You guys are crazy” was pretty much the response we got from any and everyone who heard of our trip. There were moments when I wondered myself if I was crazy, especially when we were buying clothes to prep for the trip. We are islanders. Period. 30 degrees, sun, sand and sea – that’s how we lived all our lives. So venturing out to almost the North Pole was bordering on crazy. But there were too many once in a lifetime things which can happen only that north, so we had to do it.

A few days in Stockholm, acclimatizing ourselves to sub zero temperature, we boarded a flight to Lulea to start our adventure – one that would help possibly tick two items off our bucket list – 1) see the elusive Aurora Borealis and 2) spend a night on ice.

We spent the first night in a hotel with tree houses for rooms! After checking in, we hiked 500m to our own unique little house up on the trees. We had picked the breathtaking mirror cube.

DSC_0226i

DSC_1038IMG_2882 IMG_2883 IMG_2896

There was also the not so blue ‘Blue Cone’, ‘the UFO’, ‘the Dragon Fly’, ‘the Cabin’ and ‘the Bird’s Nest’ in the vicinity.

 DSC_0259  DSC_0240

DSC_0231   DSC_0238

A group of journalists from the French Channel 5 were doing a documentary on the hotel and found out that a group of Sri Lankans had ventured out into the arctic. Their curiosity got the better of them and we were interviewed, filmed and featured in their travel program! We were feeling like celebrities and it was only day 1!

 IMG_2914   IMG_2917 IMG_2918

After our near famous encounter with the French journalists we decided to take a cat nap in the early evening because there was unfortunately very little hope of seeing the northern lights due to extremely cloudy skies. As we were drifting into a peaceful slumber we were woken up by the shrill of the phone – it was the reception saying that the lights were out. We rushed to layer ourselves and dashed out of our tree houses. But there was nothing visible except for some light white clouds. It was then that I remembered a blog I’d read some time ago that said they saw the northern lights as white clouds but long exposure photographs revealed the elusive green lights. So we tried that and sure enough, there it was – the traveling streaks of Aurora Borealis.

DSC_1073

But there wasn’t much to see to the naked eye, was that it? Was that what the fuss was all about? Slightly disappointed we went off to sleep after dinner. It was then that we got the second call saying the lights were out and it was very strong. We only had to open our doors to see the green hues in the sky all around us, behind the pine tree forest. One look skywards and my heart stopped. The northern lights were out in all it’s glory and put on a show of a lifetime!

DSC_1102 DSC_1107 DSC_1110 DSC_1112  DSC_1126

We stood for hours in sub zero temperature admiring natures own fireworks. It had no sign of stopping, showing off hues of green, purple and red. After a while the cold got to our bones, so we called it a night.

DSC_1094DSC_1099 DSC_1097

The next day we woke up to a bright and sunny winter day and took a 5 hour train ride to Abisko, a little village up in the arctic mountains known for it’s light shows. The train crossed into the arctic circle and we whizzed past miles and miles of snow covered forests. At first they were thick forests and gradually the trees became short and sparse and vanished all together. All that was left was miles and miles of mountains and nothingness that reminded me of the ice planet in interstellar.

DSC_0347

We arrived at our mountain lodge set up on a small hill on the banks of Lake Torneträsk. This ginormous lake apparently ensured that clouds didn’t stick in the sky and this increased our chance of seeing the Northern Lights.

After having reindeer for dinner (forgive me Rudolph) we wore a gazillion layers and trekked our way up to the foot of yet another mountain to take a chair lift up to the Aurora Sky Station. A viewing deck set up just to monitor and see the northern lights. They gave us warm overalls that weighed a ton, and given our primal fear of the cold we wore it and made our way up the lift looking like mini yetis.

DSC_0282

The ride up the chairlift was cold and eerie. The clouds covered the top of the mountain and everything was pitch black. Maybe it was a good thing I couldn’t see how far down the ground was, I’m not entirely a fan of heights.

We spent 3 good hours in the sky station, freezing our ***** off waiting against all odds for the clouds to clear and the lights to start. Unfortunately for us the cloud cover was so thick, there was absolutely no chance of seeing the lights that night. We had the option of spending the night in the sky station and taking the chairlift back in the morning when it started at 8am expecting the lights to show. But we opted to sleep on our comfortable warm beds back in the lodge. Good call, since the clouds never cleared.

Day 3 morning started with meeting Peter, our guide and hopping into his snowmobile drawn sled before heading off on our own snowmobile adventure. Pramodh and I got a snowmobile to share and of course he drove first. We made our way into the Abisko National Park, we rode through the forest, over creeks and across lakes before lo and behold it started snowing. Oh what beauty. This was the first time I was experiencing a proper snow shower.

DSC_1271

DSC_1348

I immediately fell in love with the white flakes falling from above. This was perfection. I could almost forgive the clouds for blocking the aurora last night.

DSC_1494

It was my turn to ride. What an amazing experience, the wind in my face, semi frozen fingers and no complains. The forest opened up to reveal a beautiful frozen lake and we rode right across. I may have exceeded the speed limit here, but I couldn’t help myself.

DSC_1442

We took a break for a hot cuppa, made snow angels and attempted to make a snow man before riding back to the village through the wilderness.

DSC_1241

DSC_0334

That night we were meeting the folks from Lappaland Media for a Aurora photo course. We hiked down towards the lake from the lodge and set up camp right in the middle of the frozen Lake Torneträsk to learn the basics of Aurora photography. Nikalas our instructor had built a cute little igloo so we started taking test shots of it when her majesty Aurora Borealis decided to make an appearance (yes! Twice in three days). It wasn’t as strong as the first day but it danced all over the sky and gave us a great show. 

IMG_7002

Standing in the middle of a frozen lake in temperatures waaaay below zero looking up at the sky and admiring this light show was truly humbling. For all the man made marvels and advances in science, nature does have a way of making you feel small. 

_MG_4148  _MG_4157

The next morning we set out to explore our surroundings while the sun was still out. We discovered a frozen river, a dead drop cliff and a Sami village. 

DSC_1552 DSC_1546

Not bad for a few hours of wandering about. And that afternoon we caught the train and headed south to Kiruna and checked into the Ice Hotel! 

DSC_1635

Don’t ask me why sleeping on ice made it to my bucket list, but it did. So here we were, in the banks of the Thorne River, the site of probably one of the greatest living art projects – the Ice Hotel

The Ice Hotel is built up from scratch every year using ice from the Thorne River. When spring comes the hotel melts and flows back into the river. A perfect cycle. I would have probably gotten bored and given up in year 3, but the artists behind this amazing creation have been doing it for 25 years! 

DSC_0235

From the outside its a bit disappointing because all you see is a short building with reindeer skin covered doors. But when you open those doors, oh boy..you step into the most amazing frozen castle, like something out of the movie Frozen. I could be Elsa and live here! 

DSC_0143 DSC_0147 DSC_0407  DSC_0091

Every bit of the castle is carved to perfection – the ice chandeliers, the long beautiful corridor, the seats and tables – stunning! 

DSC_0160 DSC_0122

And then there are the Art Suites! Each one different from the other, each one created by a set of artists with a story to tell. 

2   DSC_0111 DSC_0114   DSC_0127

After admiring this epic art project we hit the bar! So this, ladies and gentleman marks the first time I was intoxicated; in front of my in laws no less! I blame it partly on the cold and partly on the very handsome swede who served the drinks. When I picked my first drink his comment was “oh that’s a rare choice. Only a strong few can handle the spice!” So how was I to back down from there. Drinks were served in ice glasses that melted away bit by bit with every sip. There might have been 3 maybe 4 shots that followed..oh well..I was a light drinker and badly needed the dinner that followed. I could only pray that no one noticed me accidentally dropping my phone into the gravy three times. What’s a girl gonna do if her phone decided to test gravity!?!

DSC_0072 DSC_0107  DSC_0217DSC_0165 DSC_0199  DSC_0076DSC_0225

After dinner we made our way to the hotel’s dressing room and equipped ourself with everything we needed to survive the night – a sleeping bag made for -40 degrees although it was only -5 inside, hats to cover our heads and scarfs to cover our faces and thick socks. Clad in our thermals as adviced we carried our gear and walked to the hotel. That’s when the lights decided to come out for the night with a show almost as strong as what we saw the first night. Of course Pramodh by this time had seen all he wanted to of the northern lights, especially after the first night’s epic show; he didn’t want to stand outside freezing in his thermals. So we rushed inside and made our way through the ice corridor and found our room. 

The ice bed in the centre had reindeer skin and a soft mattress. We set up our sleeping bag and jumped inside. I wasn’t sure if I would survive the night. I woke up a few times and had serious doubts. But we had each other and the thick sleeping bag for warmth, so we did in fact make it through the night. When the staff woke us up with warm Lingonberry juice the next morning, not only was I happy to be alive (and not frozen), I was also very proud of myself for braving the cold. 

IMG_2948

As a reward we all went dog sledding! A sled drawn by 11 Alaskan huskies was waiting for us by the river. What beautiful dogs! They absolutely loved running and did not want to stay still. So till we got on to the sled and they got the signal to go, there was a complete ruckus – non stop barking, jumping and pulling. 

DSC_03403   DSC_0375

It was a thrilling experience once again speeding through forests, across frozen lakes and rivers, watching the dogs eat ice every few mins while running in perfect formation. 

5

There is one thing you need to know if you want to enjoy dog sledding – do not sit in front of the sled. Those dogs fart. ALOT. And they poo throughout the ride. Not a pleasant sight or smell. Other than that everything else was perfect. DSC_0353  DSC_0383

Our last adventure before heading back to the tropics was an encounter with a herd of reindeer who lived in a Sami Village. We got the chance to pet and feed them before saying goodbye to the Arctic.

1 7  DSC_0481 DSC_0491   DSC_0550

We got pretty lucky, the Aurora Borealis danced for us 3 out of the 4 nights we were out in the arctic, we raced snowmobiles while it was snowing, lived in a tree house, got featured on the French Channel 5, survived a night on ice and rode a dog sled through the beautiful arctic landscape. There aren’t too many other things that come close to this adventure. 

Provençal charm – Lavender fields and much more

Have you seen these pictures of the lavender fields in Provence? If you have and you don’t have it in your bucket list, we can never be friends.

Fields-of-Lavender-in-Provence-France

We chose the end of July to visit France, just so that we can see the Provençal summer and see lavenders in bloom. After carefully mapping out a route to give us the best that Provence had to offer we were on our way. We took an early morning train from Paris to Avignon and hired a car from one of the many rental companies at the station. We spent that night in St. Remy, a slight diversion from our route, but probably one of the best decisions we made.

Saint Remy de Provence is an idyllic French village with tree lined streets, amazing villas, cafés surrounded by vineyards. We had booked a place via Airbnb, our first time using the site. This probably was the second best decision we made! Our room was in an amazing French villa, Chambre Sous la tonnelle, one seemingly out of a magazine.

DSC_0858

Our hosts Marie Annick & Roman were everything we wished for and more! They served us home made bread, jam and pies for breakfast before we set off on our road trip.

Breakfast

DSC_0866

DSC_0873

So why did we pick this seemingly random village? They have a very famous market on Wednesdays that sells everything from olives to cured meat to soap to lavender! This is what I call paradise. If Pramodh hadn’t dragged me – almost kicking and screaming – I think I’d still be walking from store to store inspecting every bit of merchandise and tasting every free sample. We bought door knobs, lavender soaps, mini lavender filled cushions and an amazing array of sauces and dips – olive, sundried tomato, artichokes, chili, and everything in between..Mouth-watering!!

DSC_0879 DSC_0883 DSC_0885 DSC_0890 DSC_0893 DSC_0878

DSC_0875

Finally we were on the road in search of those picturesque lavender fields. Our first stop – Gordes. This beautiful village set on a cliff welcomes you with a jaw dropping view. You have to have to stop at the viewing point to breathe it in.

DSC_0904

Gordes seem to be a holiday resort for the rich and famous. We made a quick stop and left in search of the lavender dream which we were yet to see.

DSC_0909

DSC_0908

Our next stop did. not. disappoint. Abbaye Notre-Dame de Sénanque merely 15 mins down the cliff from Gordes. If you google lavender fields in Provence you will most definitely see this picture. Well not this picture because I took this, but a picture of this very same landscape.

DSC_0947

Monks in this abbey have over the years cultivated the seemingly most photographed lavender field, god bless them!

DSC_0928

After snapping a gazillion pictures and almost being stung by bees in the field we were on the road again. You can enjoy the view of the lavender fields on each side of the road as you drive past. Those google pictures don’t lie. Just pray your timing is right and you are there when the flower is blooming just before they are harvested, which happens to be around mid July to mid August.

DSC_0912

DSC_0922DSC_0944

DSC_0962

In between vineyards and lavender fields the countryside was decorated with sunflower patches. Never realized that these flowers were enormous, bigger than my whole face!

DSC_1000

My face DSC_1005

Our next stop, the interesting little town of Roussillon. The mineral rocks in the area used to build the town are red as is the whole town.

The red mineral rocks

Roussillon

Our final destination for the day was Aix-en-Provence. But before that we had to stop for a very late lunch in Loumarin, we were famished! This is as idyllic as a Provençal town can get – beautiful sandstone buildings decorated with colorful windows adorned with running vines – I could photograph them forever

DSC_0978DSC_0985DSC_0991DSC_0998

I’m adding Provence to my list places to retire in, if I earn enough to buy a villa in a vineyard on a cliff overlooking a lavender field with my own patch of sunflowers